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About the Ashton to Tetonia Trail

Begins: Ashton, Idaho

Ends: Tetonia, Idaho

Trail can be accessed from these locations

  • Ashton
  • Marysville
  • Bitch Creek
  • Felt
  • Tetonia

Elevation

5,277 – 6,064 ft.

Elevation Gain

787 ft. (Ashton to Tetonia)

Trail length

29.6 miles

Restroom Facilities

Yes

Trail Type

Gravel rail bed 

Types of use

Hiking, biking, and horseback riding

Winter

Nordic, snowshoe, and snowmobile

Overnight

No overnight camping

Pets

Dogs are allowed on leash

What to Bring

Water, day pack, sunscreen, high energy food, small first aid kit, camera, and sunglasses

Safety tips

  • Bikers yield to pedestrians
  • All trail users yield to horses
  • Always use lights at night
  • Obey road crossing signs

Learning

Information kiosks are located at Marysville and Bitch Creek

Maps

Trail maps are available under the 'Maps' tab.


Ashton-Tetonia Trail

The Ashton-Tetonia Trail opened to the public in 2010 and is administered by the Idaho department of Parks and Recreation and managed through Harriman State Park. This 29.6 mile trail follows the abandoned railroad grade of the Teton Valley Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad from Ashton to Tetonia. Visitors will enjoy the beautiful farm country of Eastern Idaho, spectacular views of the Teton Mountains and historic railroad trestle crossings.  Visitors can experience the trail by hiking, biking, horseback riding, as well as Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling in winter.

Maps

Trail Maps are available under the 'Maps' tab.


History of the Trail

Today, visitors to the Ashton-Tetonia Trail enjoy the beauty of Eastern Idaho from the abandoned railroad grade of Union Pacific’s Teton Valley branch. Construction of the railroad began in 1910, and was completed to Victor on December 18, 1912. The 45.6 mile line was intended to promote development of the sparsely populated Teton Valley. The towns of Tetonia, Drummond, Driggs, Victor, Felt, and Marysville prospered with the arrival of the railroad. The rail line transported important agricultural freight such as, livestock, peas, and grain from the Teton Valley as well as Jackson Hole. Limestone mined near Fox Creek was also shipped by rail to the Sugar factory in Lincoln, Idaho for the purification process of beet sugar.

Though heavy snowfall often closed the line for days at a time, the railroad was essential for transportation in the Teton Valley. For many years, passenger trains ran to and from Victor each day, with connections in Ashton and Idaho Falls for Pocatello and Salt Lake City. With the establishment of Grand Teton National Park in 1929, Union Pacific began running passenger trains in the summer months to Victor. Many tourists traveling to both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks used the line until it was abandoned in the late 1960’s.

Improvements to state highways 32 and 33 caused a significant decline in rail use. Fewer people traveled by passenger train, and much of the freight began to be transported by trucks. The line was abandoned from Tetonia south to Victor in 1981. In 1984 the line from Ashton to Tetonia was also abandoned. All the rails have since been removed. The three major bridge crossings at Fall River, Conant Creek, and Bitch Creek were left in place, and are now popular landmarks along the trail.

"Today, visitors to the Ashton-Tetonia Trail enjoy the beauty of Eastern Idaho from the abandoned railroad grade of Union Pacific’s Teton Valley branch."

Next Events

No events found.

See all Ashton to Tetonia Trail events



150 MILES FOR 150 YEARS

About the Program

In conjunction with the Sesquicentennial Celebration taking place throughout Idaho this year, Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is pleased to announce a new program – “150 Miles for 150 Years”.

This program encourages groups, families or individuals to get out and recreate specifically on these three trail systems – The Coeur d’Alene Trail and the Coeur d’Alene Parkway in northern Idaho, and the Ashton-Tetonia Trail in southeastern Idaho.

Each group, family, or individual that logs 150 miles of non-motorized recreation on these trails from June 15, 2013 – June 15, 2014 will receive a certificate of recognition, Idaho State Parks lapel pins, and will also be entered to win an annual MVEF pass to all 30 of Idaho’s State Parks.

These three trail systems are ideal to include in Sesquicentennial programming because they are located in regions that are historically rich and were vibrant during the Territorial Era. More information about the three trails is below.

Participants will need to submit their completed trail logs and a photo or two for documentation as well as their names, addresses and telephone numbers in order be considered eligible.  Mileage logs are available for download at the bottom of this page.

Submissions will be accepted via email, regular mail, or fax. Remember, only non-motorized trail use counts as acceptable entries. A similar program is being offered by Boise City Parks and Recreation – while the two programs are unrelated, this statewide program allows residents in northern and eastern areas of the state a chance to participate in a Sesquicentennial recreation challenge as well.

Keep in mind that participants have the option to do this as individuals, classes, groups, and couples – whatever. Only one entry per 150 miles, though. For example, if a class of fifty students does a three-mile interpretive hike on the Trail of the Coeur d’Alene, they, as a whole entity, will get one certificate. If an individual logs 150 miles, he or she will get a certificate. If a family of four logs 150 different miles through several different outings, the family will receive one certificate.

 

About the Trails

Trail of the Coeur d’Alene Attributes

The "Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes" is one of the most spectacular and popular trails in the western United States.Here, you will find 73 miles of asphalt that’s perfect for road bikers and in-line skaters.

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes nearly spans the Panhandle of Idaho as it runs along  rivers, beside lakes and through Idaho’s historic Silver Valley. The uniqueness of the trail isn’t simply the beautiful scenery and attractions along its route, but it’s an innovative solution to the environmental problems caused by the early miners in the Valley.

Silver was discovered inthe Valley around 1884 and construction of the rail line to support the growing mining and timber industries was started in 1888. Much of the trail today follows this original rail line, giving it a gentle grade. When the rail line was built, mine waste rock and tailings containing heavy metals were used for the original rail bed. In addition, the bed was contaminated with accidental ore concentrate spillage.

Now, the trail itself is part of the environmental cleanup in a partnership between the Union Pacific Railroad, the U.S. Government, the State of Idaho and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. The thick layer of asphalt on the trail and the gravel barriers along the trail serve to isolate the contaminants and allow the area to be used once again. Although not the entire trail is susceptible to recontamination, it’s best to use caution and follow trail rules.

The section between Plummer and Harrison has been thoroughly cleaned and is not susceptible to recontamination. Because the section between Harrison and Mullan is vulnerable to flooding, contaminants may be in the soil around the trail. Please stay on the trail and in designated picnic areas.

Location

Begins in Plummer, ID, ends in Mullan, ID.

Interpretive panels on the trail.

There are 19 trailheads and 18 scenic waysides along the trail.

Elevation

3,400 - 2,200

Trail length

72 miles

Trail top

10-foot wide asphalt.

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair.

Overnight

Camping prohibited on trail, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance.

Idaho State Parks nearby

Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park.

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses.

Safety tips

Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets; always use lights at night; obey road crossing signs.

Watch for wildlife!

Winter Use

 

Nordic and snowshoe.

Learning

Interpretive signage, Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park (Sacred Encounters Museum Exhibit).

Pets

Yes, on leash and under control at all times.

CDA Parkway Attributes

Walkers, hikers and cyclists of all ages love Coeur d' Alene Lake Parkway State Park.  Spend the day on foot, on bike wheels or on the half-mile long beach.  The paved parkway lies along the north shore of Lake Coeur d' Alene and has 5.7 miles of non-motorized fun.  The parkway is part of the nationally famous North Idaho Centennial Trail, a multi-use recreational trail system that meanders for 24 miles from the Idaho/Washington state line.  Along the parkway is Higgens Point where there is a boat launch facility and group picnic area overlooking the lake.  

The parkway also includes an exercise course, roadside picnic tables, restroom facilities and benches for those who wish to stop and just enjoy views of the lake and the soaring Veterans Memorial Bridge.  During the winter, spectators watch as Bald Eagle visit the park during the southern migration.

Coeur d' Alene Parkway is proud to manage a portion of the North Idaho Centennial Trail, which is a part of the Millennium Legacy trail system. 

Location

Just east of Coeur d’Alene. Alongside the trail is Higgens Point, where there is a boat launch facility and group picnic area overlooking the lake.  Also features: exercise course, roadside picnic tables, restroom facilities and benches.

The Coeur d'Alene Parkway.

Trail length

5.7 miles

Trail top

Asphalt

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair.

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses.

Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets; always use lights at night; obey road crossing signs.

Winter

Nordic and snowshoe.

Pets

Yes, on leash and under control at all times.

Ashton-to-Tetonia Trail Attributes

The Ashton-Tetonia Trail officially opened in 2010 and extends nearly 30 miles between the towns of Ashton and Tetonia, Idaho. The trail occupies an abandoned rail spur once operated by Union Pacific (the Oregon Short Line). The trail includes five bridges and restored rail trestles. The gravel trail is enjoyed by mountain bikers and hikers alike. Users might consider traveling from Ashton to Tetonia so that they can enjoy views of the Teton Mountains, but should keep in mind it is slightly uphill in this direction (only 800 feet elevation gain over the course of the trail).

Location

Begins in Ashton, ID, and ends in Tetonia, ID. Includes five bridges and restored rail trestles.

One of the trestles along the Ashton-to-Tetonia Trail.

Trail length

29.6 miles

Types of use

Walk, bike, horseback, snowmobile in winter months.

 

Downloads and Contact

  • Download an Example Log Here

  • Download a Blank Log Here (.doc or .pdf)

Submit completed logs to:

  • Email: inquiry@idpr.idaho.gov
  • Fax: 208-334-5232
  • Mail: Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, Attention: Marketing and Public Relations, 5657 Warm Springs Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83716

 

About the Ashton to Tetonia Trail

Begins: Ashton, Idaho

Ends: Tetonia, Idaho

Trail can be accessed from these locations

  • Ashton
  • Marysville
  • Bitch Creek
  • Felt
  • Tetonia

Elevation

5,277 – 6,064 ft.

Elevation Gain

787 ft. (Ashton to Tetonia)

Trail length

29.6 miles

Restroom Facilities

Yes

Trail Type

Gravel rail bed 

Types of use

Hiking, biking, and horseback riding

Winter

Nordic, snowshoe, and snowmobile

Overnight

No overnight camping

Pets

Dogs are allowed on leash

What to Bring

Water, day pack, sunscreen, high energy food, small first aid kit, camera, and sunglasses

Safety tips

  • Bikers yield to pedestrians
  • All trail users yield to horses
  • Always use lights at night
  • Obey road crossing signs

Learning

Information kiosks are located at Marysville and Bitch Creek

Maps

Trail maps are available under the 'Maps' tab.

Ashton-Tetonia Trail

The Ashton-Tetonia Trail opened to the public in 2010 and is administered by the Idaho department of Parks and Recreation and managed through Harriman State Park. This 29.6 mile trail follows the abandoned railroad grade of the Teton Valley Branch of the Union Pacific Railroad from Ashton to Tetonia. Visitors will enjoy the beautiful farm country of Eastern Idaho, spectacular views of the Teton Mountains and historic railroad trestle crossings.  Visitors can experience the trail by hiking, biking, horseback riding, as well as Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, and snowmobiling in winter.

Maps

Trail Maps are available under the 'Maps' tab.

History of the Trail

Today, visitors to the Ashton-Tetonia Trail enjoy the beauty of Eastern Idaho from the abandoned railroad grade of Union Pacific’s Teton Valley branch. Construction of the railroad began in 1910, and was completed to Victor on December 18, 1912. The 45.6 mile line was intended to promote development of the sparsely populated Teton Valley. The towns of Tetonia, Drummond, Driggs, Victor, Felt, and Marysville prospered with the arrival of the railroad. The rail line transported important agricultural freight such as, livestock, peas, and grain from the Teton Valley as well as Jackson Hole. Limestone mined near Fox Creek was also shipped by rail to the Sugar factory in Lincoln, Idaho for the purification process of beet sugar.

Though heavy snowfall often closed the line for days at a time, the railroad was essential for transportation in the Teton Valley. For many years, passenger trains ran to and from Victor each day, with connections in Ashton and Idaho Falls for Pocatello and Salt Lake City. With the establishment of Grand Teton National Park in 1929, Union Pacific began running passenger trains in the summer months to Victor. Many tourists traveling to both Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks used the line until it was abandoned in the late 1960’s.

Improvements to state highways 32 and 33 caused a significant decline in rail use. Fewer people traveled by passenger train, and much of the freight began to be transported by trucks. The line was abandoned from Tetonia south to Victor in 1981. In 1984 the line from Ashton to Tetonia was also abandoned. All the rails have since been removed. The three major bridge crossings at Fall River, Conant Creek, and Bitch Creek were left in place, and are now popular landmarks along the trail.

"Today, visitors to the Ashton-Tetonia Trail enjoy the beauty of Eastern Idaho from the abandoned railroad grade of Union Pacific’s Teton Valley branch."

Next Events

No events found.

See all Ashton to Tetonia Trail events

150 MILES FOR 150 YEARS

About the Program

In conjunction with the Sesquicentennial Celebration taking place throughout Idaho this year, Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is pleased to announce a new program – “150 Miles for 150 Years”.

This program encourages groups, families or individuals to get out and recreate specifically on these three trail systems – The Coeur d’Alene Trail and the Coeur d’Alene Parkway in northern Idaho, and the Ashton-Tetonia Trail in southeastern Idaho.

Each group, family, or individual that logs 150 miles of non-motorized recreation on these trails from June 15, 2013 – June 15, 2014 will receive a certificate of recognition, Idaho State Parks lapel pins, and will also be entered to win an annual MVEF pass to all 30 of Idaho’s State Parks.

These three trail systems are ideal to include in Sesquicentennial programming because they are located in regions that are historically rich and were vibrant during the Territorial Era. More information about the three trails is below.

Participants will need to submit their completed trail logs and a photo or two for documentation as well as their names, addresses and telephone numbers in order be considered eligible.  Mileage logs are available for download at the bottom of this page.

Submissions will be accepted via email, regular mail, or fax. Remember, only non-motorized trail use counts as acceptable entries. A similar program is being offered by Boise City Parks and Recreation – while the two programs are unrelated, this statewide program allows residents in northern and eastern areas of the state a chance to participate in a Sesquicentennial recreation challenge as well.

Keep in mind that participants have the option to do this as individuals, classes, groups, and couples – whatever. Only one entry per 150 miles, though. For example, if a class of fifty students does a three-mile interpretive hike on the Trail of the Coeur d’Alene, they, as a whole entity, will get one certificate. If an individual logs 150 miles, he or she will get a certificate. If a family of four logs 150 different miles through several different outings, the family will receive one certificate.

 

About the Trails

Trail of the Coeur d’Alene Attributes

The "Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes" is one of the most spectacular and popular trails in the western United States.Here, you will find 73 miles of asphalt that’s perfect for road bikers and in-line skaters.

The Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes nearly spans the Panhandle of Idaho as it runs along  rivers, beside lakes and through Idaho’s historic Silver Valley. The uniqueness of the trail isn’t simply the beautiful scenery and attractions along its route, but it’s an innovative solution to the environmental problems caused by the early miners in the Valley.

Silver was discovered inthe Valley around 1884 and construction of the rail line to support the growing mining and timber industries was started in 1888. Much of the trail today follows this original rail line, giving it a gentle grade. When the rail line was built, mine waste rock and tailings containing heavy metals were used for the original rail bed. In addition, the bed was contaminated with accidental ore concentrate spillage.

Now, the trail itself is part of the environmental cleanup in a partnership between the Union Pacific Railroad, the U.S. Government, the State of Idaho and the Coeur d’Alene Tribe. The thick layer of asphalt on the trail and the gravel barriers along the trail serve to isolate the contaminants and allow the area to be used once again. Although not the entire trail is susceptible to recontamination, it’s best to use caution and follow trail rules.

The section between Plummer and Harrison has been thoroughly cleaned and is not susceptible to recontamination. Because the section between Harrison and Mullan is vulnerable to flooding, contaminants may be in the soil around the trail. Please stay on the trail and in designated picnic areas.

Location

Begins in Plummer, ID, ends in Mullan, ID.

Interpretive panels on the trail.

There are 19 trailheads and 18 scenic waysides along the trail.

Elevation

3,400 - 2,200

Trail length

72 miles

Trail top

10-foot wide asphalt.

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair.

Overnight

Camping prohibited on trail, but there are several public and private operated facilities within easy distance.

Idaho State Parks nearby

Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park.

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses.

Safety tips

Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets; always use lights at night; obey road crossing signs.

Watch for wildlife!

Winter Use

 

Nordic and snowshoe.

Learning

Interpretive signage, Heyburn State Park, Coeur d' Alene's Old Mission State Park (Sacred Encounters Museum Exhibit).

Pets

Yes, on leash and under control at all times.

CDA Parkway Attributes

Walkers, hikers and cyclists of all ages love Coeur d' Alene Lake Parkway State Park.  Spend the day on foot, on bike wheels or on the half-mile long beach.  The paved parkway lies along the north shore of Lake Coeur d' Alene and has 5.7 miles of non-motorized fun.  The parkway is part of the nationally famous North Idaho Centennial Trail, a multi-use recreational trail system that meanders for 24 miles from the Idaho/Washington state line.  Along the parkway is Higgens Point where there is a boat launch facility and group picnic area overlooking the lake.  

The parkway also includes an exercise course, roadside picnic tables, restroom facilities and benches for those who wish to stop and just enjoy views of the lake and the soaring Veterans Memorial Bridge.  During the winter, spectators watch as Bald Eagle visit the park during the southern migration.

Coeur d' Alene Parkway is proud to manage a portion of the North Idaho Centennial Trail, which is a part of the Millennium Legacy trail system. 

Location

Just east of Coeur d’Alene. Alongside the trail is Higgens Point, where there is a boat launch facility and group picnic area overlooking the lake.  Also features: exercise course, roadside picnic tables, restroom facilities and benches.

The Coeur d'Alene Parkway.

Trail length

5.7 miles

Trail top

Asphalt

Types of use

Walk, bike, in-line skate, electric wheelchair.

What to bring

Water, daypack, sunscreen, high-energy food, small first-aid kit, trail map, camera and sunglasses.

Safety tips
Bikers and in-line skaters should always wear helmets; always use lights at night; obey road crossing signs.

Winter

Nordic and snowshoe.

Pets

Yes, on leash and under control at all times.

Ashton-to-Tetonia Trail Attributes

The Ashton-Tetonia Trail officially opened in 2010 and extends nearly 30 miles between the towns of Ashton and Tetonia, Idaho. The trail occupies an abandoned rail spur once operated by Union Pacific (the Oregon Short Line). The trail includes five bridges and restored rail trestles. The gravel trail is enjoyed by mountain bikers and hikers alike. Users might consider traveling from Ashton to Tetonia so that they can enjoy views of the Teton Mountains, but should keep in mind it is slightly uphill in this direction (only 800 feet elevation gain over the course of the trail).

Location

Begins in Ashton, ID, and ends in Tetonia, ID. Includes five bridges and restored rail trestles.

One of the trestles along the Ashton-to-Tetonia Trail.

Trail length

29.6 miles

Types of use

Walk, bike, horseback, snowmobile in winter months.

 

Downloads and Contact

  • Download an Example Log Here

  • Download a Blank Log Here (.doc or .pdf)

Submit completed logs to:

  • Email: inquiry@idpr.idaho.gov
  • Fax: 208-334-5232
  • Mail: Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation, Attention: Marketing and Public Relations, 5657 Warm Springs Avenue, Boise, Idaho 83716