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Riding in Idaho

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation wants to make sure you are prepared, educated and legal before you take to the trail on your off-highway vehicle (OHV). Be sure to stay on trails when you venture out on your OHV.  Visit Stay On Trails to learn more.

To find OHV trail maps across the state visit the Idaho Trail Mapping Program.

Anyone who will operate an OHV should complete a free IDPR Responsible Riders education course to acquire your ATV Safety Education Certificate.

Learn more about OHV laws, Idaho rules and guidelines, safety, trip planning and much more by viewing or downloading a free brochure, Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Program.

Click here for statistics about OHV/Motorbike/UHV registrations in Idaho.

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports are conveniently available on the Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program Facebook. Click the following links to view reports for the North, South, and East Regions, and be sure to "Like" the program to receive regular reports and event-related information.

Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) registration sticker fees fund education programs, trail clearing and maintenance projects throughout the state, as well as support valuable ATV/UTV and motorbike safety courses for all ages.

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Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program

The Idaho ATV/Motorbike program is funded through registration fees purchased by the enthusiast. On January 1 of each year, every motorbike (dirtbike), ATV, UTV, or specialty off-highway vehicle (SOHV) operated on public or private land must register their machine to legally operate. The public exemptions from registering and off-highway vehicle exists if the vehicle is only for plowing snow or agricultural purposes. The cost of the registration is $12. Non-residents with a current registration from their state of residence are legal to operate in Idaho.

How your registration fees are broken down?

  • $1.50 vendor fee
  • $1 goes to Idaho Department of Lands to provide OHV opportunities
  • $1 goes to county sheriffs for dedicated OHV law enforcement
  • 85% goes to trail maintenance, construction and education programs
  • Up to 15% is utilized for administration and the production of registration stickers

What are the registration fees used for?

  • Trail maintenance on OHV Trails by the IDPR Trail Ranger program
  • Trail maintenance and construction on OHV trails by the IDPR Trail Cat program
  • ATV and Motorbike safety programs for all ages
  • Online OHV trail mapping application
  • Grants for OHV trail construction, maintenance, signing and trailhead facilities

 


Safety and Education

See video

OHV Safety Classes

Anyone who will operate an off-highway vehicle (OHV) should complete a free IDPR Responsible Riders education course to acquire your OHV Safety Education Certificate. Idaho law requires any operator under the age of 16 when operating on a US Forest Service road to complete an IDPR approved OHV Safety course.  Currently Idaho recognizes OHV education certificates issued from IDPR or any “state issued” certification cards. The state card must possess the logo of the state or state agency providing the OHV education on the certificate.

This free one-day course is offered by Idaho Parks and Recreation.  Classes are offered throughout the state for anyone who will be operating an OHV including an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), motorbike or utility type vehicles (UTV). The course includes training on safe riding, proper machine sizing, responsible and ethical riding, proper handling and shifting, riding within your ability, understanding the machine's capabilities and rules of the road. Classes include home study, a written test, and three-hours of rider active training.

Course Sign-up

2014 Schedules

Optional On-line Knowledge Based Course

This IDPR approved course provides on-line certification for ATVs and motorbikes. Upon completion of the on-line test, riders are required to be certified by completing a short skills-test administered by an official IDPR OHV trainer. This course is not mandatory and only serves as an option for riders with enough riding experience to pass a rider skill evaluation, “skill-test”. Students are encouraged to study the materials thoroughly prior to the skills test.  Students who fail must take and pay for the on-line test again.

To schedule a skills test or for more information about classes, contact an IDPR OHV Trainer in your region:

Did you know?

Idaho law requires that any person without a valid driver's license who wishes to operate an OHV on US National Forest service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course.   Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on roads must also be supervised by an adult. Idaho recognizes OHV education certificates from state-issued programs only.  To be valid, the certificate must display a state/program logo to be valid. 

Use the links to the left to locate a free safety class near you!

 

 


OHV Laws, Rules and Guidelines

  • All OHV's must display a current OHV registration sticker when operated on public lands or roads. Click here to register your vehicle.
  • Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Non-residents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e. county roads).
  • Riders and passengers under age 18 must wear a helmet.
  • Any person without a valid driver's license who wishes to operate an OHV on US National Forest service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course and carry their completion certificate while operating their OHV.
  • Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on Idaho roads must also be supervised by a licensed adult operator. 
  • It is illegal to drive an OHV while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 
  • A brightly colored "whip flag" must be attached to OHV's when riding in sand dune areas. 
  • Lights must be used between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ride only in OHV designated areas. 
  • Ride on the right side of the road or trail and in single file. 
  • Be alert to oncoming traffic, especially on blind curves or in dips and crests of hills.
  • Be sure your brakes will control and stop your OHV. 
  • Mufflers with an approved spark arrestor are required on all OHVs

More information 

View or download the Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Program brochure.

 

Did you know?

Idaho law requires that any person without a valid motor vehicle license who wishes to operate an OHV on National Forest Service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course. Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on roads must also be supervised by an adult. Idaho currently recognizes OHV Education certificates from State-issued programs. Certificates must have the State or Program logo displayed on the certificate.


Where to Ride Your OHV in Idaho

 

Thanks to OHV registration fees, an online trail mapping program allows you to browse the entire state of Idaho for motorbike, ATV, UTV and jeep trails. You can calculate distances, download and print maps or export your trail map to Google Earth or GPS.

 

 

 

Did you know?

When you register your OHV, the fees collected go towards OHV education, safety programs and trails. Click here to register.


2013 IDPR Trail Ranger Video

See video

Trail Ranger Program

 

Idaho has one of the largest systems of single-track trail in the United States. Keeping those seemingly endless miles of trails accessible to users is a task coordinated by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) Trail Ranger Program.  Funded by Idaho OHV users' registration fees, the number one goal of the IDPR Trail Ranger Program is to open the most miles of trail in a season while at the same time improving the trail system so all users can enjoy Idaho's trails.  By making more miles of trail available to trail users, users are dispersed, environmental impacts are minimized and user conflict is reduced. 
 
Every spring other management agencies around the state participate in the program. Participating agencies provide temporary housing for trail rangers as close as possible to the trail system. Housing is usually rustic — such as a Forest Service guard station; but includes a sheltered sleeping area, cooking facilities, a clean drinkable source of water, showers, and refrigeration for food. The Trail Ranger Program makes more miles of trail useable earlier in the year by removing downfall, turning out water and removing other debris from the trail. 
 
Want to be a trail ranger in Idaho? Click here to download a IDPR Trail Ranger application.
 

Trail Cat Program

The Trail Cat Program builds or rebuilds ATV and single track trails.  A mini dozer takes care of the work for the ATV trails and can build about one mile of ATV trail a day, depending upon the terrain.  A mini-excavator can build about 1/4 mile of single track trail a day in various terrain.

 
 
 

Did You Know?

In 2011:

  • Trail rangers cleared more than 1,300 miles of trails statewide
  • Trail cats reconstructed more than 130 miles of trails statewide

Learn more

Contact the specialist in your area:

 

Southwest Idaho

E-Mail or call (208)514-2413

 

North Idaho

E-Mail or call (208) 769-1511

 

East Idaho 

E-Mail or call (208) 525-7121

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports are conveniently available on the Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program Facebook. Click the following links to view reports for the North, South, and East Regions, and be sure to "Like" the program to receive regular reports and event-related information. You can also obtain the most recent report for clearing in your area by contacting the Trails Specialist for your region (above).


FAQs about OHVs in Idaho

Q. As an Idaho resident, what are the registration requirements to operate my OHV, ATV, UTV, motorbike, or specialty off-highway vehicle in Idaho?
A. All Specialty off-highway vehicles, ATVs, UTVs and motorbikes must display a current OHV registration sticker to operate in Idaho.
Q. Where do I purchase an OHV registration sticker?
A. In addition to any vendor authorized by IDPR, which will include local OHV dealers, the IDPR OHV registration stickers are available online.
Q. Where does the OHV registration sticker allow me to operate?
A. You may operate off-highway (designated OHV riding areas, areas open to cross country motorized travel, designated motorized trail systems, motocross tracks, sand dunes, etc.)You may also operate on roads on state lands and federal lands that are not part of the highway system of Idaho open to such use. There are additional requirements when operating on roads. Click here for additional information on where OHVs are allowed to operate in Idaho.
Q. Where do I place my OHV registration sticker?
A. On a motorbike used exclusively off-highway or on a dual sport motorcycle with a red white and blue motorcycle plate, the sticker needs to be placed on the rider’s right fork. On an ATV, UTV or Specialty off-highway vehicle the registration sticker must be placed upon the rear fender. The sticker must be completely visible, legible and not hidden by obstructions. If you have a restricted vehicle license plate the registration sticker must be affixed to the plate.
Q. Who does not need a restricted vehicle license plate and/or IDPR OHV registration sticker?
A. Idaho code excludes vehicles used exclusively on private land for agricultural use or snow removal. Specialty off-highway vehicles will not be issued a restricted vehicle license plate. No restricted vehicle license plate is needed for vehicles used strictly off-highway or on non-local jurisdiction roads (e.g. IDL, BLM, USFS, IDFG, IDPR and privately owned roads open to such use.
Q. Other than being properly registered or licensed, what else do I need in order to safely operate my ATV, UTV, motorbike on roads open to such use?
A. A valid driver’s license and liability insurance are required. Any person under the age of 16 must be supervised by a licensed adult operator (18+). Operators under the age of 18 must also wear a helmet. The following is recommended for safe operation but not required by law. A working brake light, a horn audible at 200’, headlight and taillight after dark or during poor visibility, and a mirror showing roadway 200' behind the vehicle.
Q. My kids don’t have driver’s licenses. Where can they operate?
A. They may legally operate off-highway as defined above. They may also operate on roads on state lands and federal lands that are not a part of the highway system of Idaho open to such use, if supervised by a licensed adult operator (18+).
Q. What happened to the restricted vehicle license plate?
A. It is still available and is required for ATV, UTV and motorbike owners who choose to operate on all roads that are part of a local jurisdictional highway system (e.g. city, county, highway district) that are open to OHV travel. This excludes all state highways and interstates.
Q. If I choose to have a restricted vehicle license plate where does it go?
A. Attached to the rear of the vehicle not less than 12” off of the ground, securely fastened and clearly visible.
Q. What if I already purchased a restricted vehicle license plate and an OHV registration sticker and only want to display the sticker?
A. You have the option to obtain a $3.00 duplicate sticker from IDPR or your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office.
Q. Do I need to title my motorbike, ATV, or UTV?
A. If you purchased a motorbike or ATV since 1/1/1991 or a UTV since 7/1/2006, you are required to title it in your name. If you purchased it before that date, you are strongly encouraged to title it, but are not required to do so. Titling enhances the chance of recovery in the event your vehicle is stolen. It provides convincing proof of ownership when you go to sell it. Also, should you suffer loss, some insurance companies will not provide payoff if you do not have a title in your name. Apply for title at your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office. You will need to take ownership documents with you. Include any signed title from the seller, manufacturer’s certificate of origin, prior registration, and bills of sale you may have. Applicable sales tax will also be due. You can contact your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office with questions pertaining to this process.
Q. What is a Specialty off-highway vehicle?
A. Any vehicle manufactured designed or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation that does not fit the definition of an ATV, UTV or motorbike as defined in Section 67-7101 Idaho Code.
Q. Will I need to title my Specialty off-highway vehicle?
A. No. Specialty off-highway vehicles aren’t titled. Many of these vehicles don’t have a VIN # or have been customized to the point that they no longer meet titling requirements. However, they are required to have an OHV registration sticker.
Q. I drive a Jeep that is licensed as a motor vehicle with the red white and blue Idaho license plate. Are you saying I must register it as an OHV now?
A. No. The OHV sticker requirement for Specialty off-highway vehicles only applies to vehicles designed or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation.
Q. I converted my motorbike to a motorcycle and already have a red, white and blue motorcycle plate on it from ITD. Does this mean I now need two plates on my bike?
A. No. Only one plate is necessary. To ride on trails, you will still need the OHV registration sticker and must affix it to the right fork. This is in addition to the current motorcycle license plate registration sticker provided by ITD with the motorcycle plate.
Q. I own an ATV or UTV and already have a red, white and blue motorcycle plate on it from ITD. Can I continue to operate with the motorcycle plate?
A. No. Motorcycles and motorbikes that have been converted to motorcycles are the only vehicles that can legally operate in Idaho with motorcycle plates.
Q. How does this new law affect nonresidents?
A. Any ATV, UTV, motorbike or specialty off-highway vehicle operated in Idaho must have either a current Idaho registration sticker or a current registration from the state in which the owner resides. A restricted vehicle license plate may be purchased for a motorbike, ATV or UTV. Nonresidents with an all-terrain vehicle, utility type vehicle, specialty off-highway vehicle or motorbike registered in another state shall have the same use privileges and responsibilities as a resident of this state with a properly registered vehicle.

Riding in Idaho

The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation wants to make sure you are prepared, educated and legal before you take to the trail on your off-highway vehicle (OHV). Be sure to stay on trails when you venture out on your OHV.  Visit Stay On Trails to learn more.

To find OHV trail maps across the state visit the Idaho Trail Mapping Program.

Anyone who will operate an OHV should complete a free IDPR Responsible Riders education course to acquire your ATV Safety Education Certificate.

Learn more about OHV laws, Idaho rules and guidelines, safety, trip planning and much more by viewing or downloading a free brochure, Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Program.

Click here for statistics about OHV/Motorbike/UHV registrations in Idaho.

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports are conveniently available on the Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program Facebook. Click the following links to view reports for the North, South, and East Regions, and be sure to "Like" the program to receive regular reports and event-related information.

Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle (OHV) registration sticker fees fund education programs, trail clearing and maintenance projects throughout the state, as well as support valuable ATV/UTV and motorbike safety courses for all ages.

Next Events

No events found.

See all ATV / Motorbike events

 

Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program

The Idaho ATV/Motorbike program is funded through registration fees purchased by the enthusiast. On January 1 of each year, every motorbike (dirtbike), ATV, UTV, or specialty off-highway vehicle (SOHV) operated on public or private land must register their machine to legally operate. The public exemptions from registering and off-highway vehicle exists if the vehicle is only for plowing snow or agricultural purposes. The cost of the registration is $12. Non-residents with a current registration from their state of residence are legal to operate in Idaho.

How your registration fees are broken down?

  • $1.50 vendor fee
  • $1 goes to Idaho Department of Lands to provide OHV opportunities
  • $1 goes to county sheriffs for dedicated OHV law enforcement
  • 85% goes to trail maintenance, construction and education programs
  • Up to 15% is utilized for administration and the production of registration stickers

What are the registration fees used for?

  • Trail maintenance on OHV Trails by the IDPR Trail Ranger program
  • Trail maintenance and construction on OHV trails by the IDPR Trail Cat program
  • ATV and Motorbike safety programs for all ages
  • Online OHV trail mapping application
  • Grants for OHV trail construction, maintenance, signing and trailhead facilities

 

Safety and Education

See video

OHV Safety Classes

Anyone who will operate an off-highway vehicle (OHV) should complete a free IDPR Responsible Riders education course to acquire your OHV Safety Education Certificate. Idaho law requires any operator under the age of 16 when operating on a US Forest Service road to complete an IDPR approved OHV Safety course.  Currently Idaho recognizes OHV education certificates issued from IDPR or any “state issued” certification cards. The state card must possess the logo of the state or state agency providing the OHV education on the certificate.

This free one-day course is offered by Idaho Parks and Recreation.  Classes are offered throughout the state for anyone who will be operating an OHV including an all-terrain vehicle (ATV), motorbike or utility type vehicles (UTV). The course includes training on safe riding, proper machine sizing, responsible and ethical riding, proper handling and shifting, riding within your ability, understanding the machine's capabilities and rules of the road. Classes include home study, a written test, and three-hours of rider active training.

Course Sign-up

2014 Schedules

Optional On-line Knowledge Based Course

This IDPR approved course provides on-line certification for ATVs and motorbikes. Upon completion of the on-line test, riders are required to be certified by completing a short skills-test administered by an official IDPR OHV trainer. This course is not mandatory and only serves as an option for riders with enough riding experience to pass a rider skill evaluation, “skill-test”. Students are encouraged to study the materials thoroughly prior to the skills test.  Students who fail must take and pay for the on-line test again.

To schedule a skills test or for more information about classes, contact an IDPR OHV Trainer in your region:

Did you know?

Idaho law requires that any person without a valid driver's license who wishes to operate an OHV on US National Forest service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course.   Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on roads must also be supervised by an adult. Idaho recognizes OHV education certificates from state-issued programs only.  To be valid, the certificate must display a state/program logo to be valid. 

Use the links to the left to locate a free safety class near you!

 

 

OHV Laws, Rules and Guidelines

  • All OHV's must display a current OHV registration sticker when operated on public lands or roads. Click here to register your vehicle.
  • Non-residents are required to have either a valid OHV registration from their home state of residence or a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker. Non-residents must purchase an Idaho restricted vehicle license plate with a valid IDPR OHV registration sticker if they don’t have a plate and wish to operate on Idaho’s local jurisdiction roads (i.e. county roads).
  • Riders and passengers under age 18 must wear a helmet.
  • Any person without a valid driver's license who wishes to operate an OHV on US National Forest service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course and carry their completion certificate while operating their OHV.
  • Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on Idaho roads must also be supervised by a licensed adult operator. 
  • It is illegal to drive an OHV while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. 
  • A brightly colored "whip flag" must be attached to OHV's when riding in sand dune areas. 
  • Lights must be used between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ride only in OHV designated areas. 
  • Ride on the right side of the road or trail and in single file. 
  • Be alert to oncoming traffic, especially on blind curves or in dips and crests of hills.
  • Be sure your brakes will control and stop your OHV. 
  • Mufflers with an approved spark arrestor are required on all OHVs

More information 

View or download the Idaho Off-Highway Vehicle Program brochure.

 

Did you know?

Idaho law requires that any person without a valid motor vehicle license who wishes to operate an OHV on National Forest Service roads must take an IDPR-approved OHV safety course. Riders 15 years and younger who wish to operate an OHV on roads must also be supervised by an adult. Idaho currently recognizes OHV Education certificates from State-issued programs. Certificates must have the State or Program logo displayed on the certificate.

Where to Ride Your OHV in Idaho

 

Thanks to OHV registration fees, an online trail mapping program allows you to browse the entire state of Idaho for motorbike, ATV, UTV and jeep trails. You can calculate distances, download and print maps or export your trail map to Google Earth or GPS.

 

 

 

Did you know?

When you register your OHV, the fees collected go towards OHV education, safety programs and trails. Click here to register.

2013 IDPR Trail Ranger Video

See video

Trail Ranger Program

 

Idaho has one of the largest systems of single-track trail in the United States. Keeping those seemingly endless miles of trails accessible to users is a task coordinated by the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation (IDPR) Trail Ranger Program.  Funded by Idaho OHV users' registration fees, the number one goal of the IDPR Trail Ranger Program is to open the most miles of trail in a season while at the same time improving the trail system so all users can enjoy Idaho's trails.  By making more miles of trail available to trail users, users are dispersed, environmental impacts are minimized and user conflict is reduced. 
 
Every spring other management agencies around the state participate in the program. Participating agencies provide temporary housing for trail rangers as close as possible to the trail system. Housing is usually rustic — such as a Forest Service guard station; but includes a sheltered sleeping area, cooking facilities, a clean drinkable source of water, showers, and refrigeration for food. The Trail Ranger Program makes more miles of trail useable earlier in the year by removing downfall, turning out water and removing other debris from the trail. 
 
Want to be a trail ranger in Idaho? Click here to download a IDPR Trail Ranger application.
 

Trail Cat Program

The Trail Cat Program builds or rebuilds ATV and single track trails.  A mini dozer takes care of the work for the ATV trails and can build about one mile of ATV trail a day, depending upon the terrain.  A mini-excavator can build about 1/4 mile of single track trail a day in various terrain.

 
 
 

Did You Know?

In 2011:

  • Trail rangers cleared more than 1,300 miles of trails statewide
  • Trail cats reconstructed more than 130 miles of trails statewide

Learn more

Contact the specialist in your area:

 

Southwest Idaho

E-Mail or call (208)514-2413

 

North Idaho

E-Mail or call (208) 769-1511

 

East Idaho 

E-Mail or call (208) 525-7121

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports

Trail Ranger and Trail Cat reports are conveniently available on the Idaho ATV/Motorbike Program Facebook. Click the following links to view reports for the North, South, and East Regions, and be sure to "Like" the program to receive regular reports and event-related information. You can also obtain the most recent report for clearing in your area by contacting the Trails Specialist for your region (above).

FAQs about OHVs in Idaho

Q. As an Idaho resident, what are the registration requirements to operate my OHV, ATV, UTV, motorbike, or specialty off-highway vehicle in Idaho?
A. All Specialty off-highway vehicles, ATVs, UTVs and motorbikes must display a current OHV registration sticker to operate in Idaho.
Q. Where do I purchase an OHV registration sticker?
A. In addition to any vendor authorized by IDPR, which will include local OHV dealers, the IDPR OHV registration stickers are available online.
Q. Where does the OHV registration sticker allow me to operate?
A. You may operate off-highway (designated OHV riding areas, areas open to cross country motorized travel, designated motorized trail systems, motocross tracks, sand dunes, etc.)You may also operate on roads on state lands and federal lands that are not part of the highway system of Idaho open to such use. There are additional requirements when operating on roads. Click here for additional information on where OHVs are allowed to operate in Idaho.
Q. Where do I place my OHV registration sticker?
A. On a motorbike used exclusively off-highway or on a dual sport motorcycle with a red white and blue motorcycle plate, the sticker needs to be placed on the rider’s right fork. On an ATV, UTV or Specialty off-highway vehicle the registration sticker must be placed upon the rear fender. The sticker must be completely visible, legible and not hidden by obstructions. If you have a restricted vehicle license plate the registration sticker must be affixed to the plate.
Q. Who does not need a restricted vehicle license plate and/or IDPR OHV registration sticker?
A. Idaho code excludes vehicles used exclusively on private land for agricultural use or snow removal. Specialty off-highway vehicles will not be issued a restricted vehicle license plate. No restricted vehicle license plate is needed for vehicles used strictly off-highway or on non-local jurisdiction roads (e.g. IDL, BLM, USFS, IDFG, IDPR and privately owned roads open to such use.
Q. Other than being properly registered or licensed, what else do I need in order to safely operate my ATV, UTV, motorbike on roads open to such use?
A. A valid driver’s license and liability insurance are required. Any person under the age of 16 must be supervised by a licensed adult operator (18+). Operators under the age of 18 must also wear a helmet. The following is recommended for safe operation but not required by law. A working brake light, a horn audible at 200’, headlight and taillight after dark or during poor visibility, and a mirror showing roadway 200' behind the vehicle.
Q. My kids don’t have driver’s licenses. Where can they operate?
A. They may legally operate off-highway as defined above. They may also operate on roads on state lands and federal lands that are not a part of the highway system of Idaho open to such use, if supervised by a licensed adult operator (18+).
Q. What happened to the restricted vehicle license plate?
A. It is still available and is required for ATV, UTV and motorbike owners who choose to operate on all roads that are part of a local jurisdictional highway system (e.g. city, county, highway district) that are open to OHV travel. This excludes all state highways and interstates.
Q. If I choose to have a restricted vehicle license plate where does it go?
A. Attached to the rear of the vehicle not less than 12” off of the ground, securely fastened and clearly visible.
Q. What if I already purchased a restricted vehicle license plate and an OHV registration sticker and only want to display the sticker?
A. You have the option to obtain a $3.00 duplicate sticker from IDPR or your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office.
Q. Do I need to title my motorbike, ATV, or UTV?
A. If you purchased a motorbike or ATV since 1/1/1991 or a UTV since 7/1/2006, you are required to title it in your name. If you purchased it before that date, you are strongly encouraged to title it, but are not required to do so. Titling enhances the chance of recovery in the event your vehicle is stolen. It provides convincing proof of ownership when you go to sell it. Also, should you suffer loss, some insurance companies will not provide payoff if you do not have a title in your name. Apply for title at your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office. You will need to take ownership documents with you. Include any signed title from the seller, manufacturer’s certificate of origin, prior registration, and bills of sale you may have. Applicable sales tax will also be due. You can contact your County Assessor Motor Vehicle Office with questions pertaining to this process.
Q. What is a Specialty off-highway vehicle?
A. Any vehicle manufactured designed or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation that does not fit the definition of an ATV, UTV or motorbike as defined in Section 67-7101 Idaho Code.
Q. Will I need to title my Specialty off-highway vehicle?
A. No. Specialty off-highway vehicles aren’t titled. Many of these vehicles don’t have a VIN # or have been customized to the point that they no longer meet titling requirements. However, they are required to have an OHV registration sticker.
Q. I drive a Jeep that is licensed as a motor vehicle with the red white and blue Idaho license plate. Are you saying I must register it as an OHV now?
A. No. The OHV sticker requirement for Specialty off-highway vehicles only applies to vehicles designed or constructed exclusively for off-highway operation.
Q. I converted my motorbike to a motorcycle and already have a red, white and blue motorcycle plate on it from ITD. Does this mean I now need two plates on my bike?
A. No. Only one plate is necessary. To ride on trails, you will still need the OHV registration sticker and must affix it to the right fork. This is in addition to the current motorcycle license plate registration sticker provided by ITD with the motorcycle plate.
Q. I own an ATV or UTV and already have a red, white and blue motorcycle plate on it from ITD. Can I continue to operate with the motorcycle plate?
A. No. Motorcycles and motorbikes that have been converted to motorcycles are the only vehicles that can legally operate in Idaho with motorcycle plates.
Q. How does this new law affect nonresidents?
A. Any ATV, UTV, motorbike or specialty off-highway vehicle operated in Idaho must have either a current Idaho registration sticker or a current registration from the state in which the owner resides. A restricted vehicle license plate may be purchased for a motorbike, ATV or UTV. Nonresidents with an all-terrain vehicle, utility type vehicle, specialty off-highway vehicle or motorbike registered in another state shall have the same use privileges and responsibilities as a resident of this state with a properly registered vehicle.